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Public Versus Private Perspectives on Open IP
The goals of the public, private and third sector in leveraging intellectual property often differ substantially and this has significant implications for access to technology and creating an equitable society. In addition, real life practices in all of these sectors may not reflect stated goals and policies. This session will examine perspectives on Open IP from industry, NGO and University tech transfer perspectives, taking the University of Cambridge as a key example.
Located in Initiatives / Open IP Faculty Research Group
How an open approach to patents could help build a sustainable future
Located in News
Open IP Faculty Research Group
The guiding question of our research group will be the extent to which open technologies result in equitable sharing of knowledge and cognitive or technology justice. 'Open' IP describes a range of approaches to knowledge production, distribution and consumption that allow more or different actors to participate in producing and benefit from technologies.
Located in Initiatives
Towards a Research Agenda for the Impact of Open IP in Emerging Technologies
This session will be an in-depth discussion of the concepts and empirical evidence that we have discussed over the last two terms, the extent to which they help us answer our original questions and what research might move us closer to those answers.
Located in Events
The Political Economy of Open IP
In this session we will explore the political economy of open IP in emerging technologies, particularly green technologies that could accelerate sustainability transitions.
Located in Events
Public Versus Private Perspectives on Open IP
This session will examine perspectives on Open IP from industry, NGO and University tech transfer perspectives, taking the University of Cambridge as a key example.
Located in Events
Exploring the Intersection of Economics, Law and Open IP
The reading groups and seminars conducted by the Faculty Research Group during the last academic year have demonstrated that legal frameworks and business models for open sharing of technology and intellectual property are still being established. During this session we will look at different frameworks that could aid our understanding of the interaction between economics, law and open intellectual property practices and that could help design strategies for future research.
Located in Events
SynBio SRI and partners awarded CRASSH Faculty Research Group 2017-18 on Open IP and emerging technologies
The Synthetic Biology SRI and partners at the Institute for Manufacturing, Centre for the Study of Existential Risk and Faculty of Law have been awarded a CRASSH Faculty Research Group on Open IO. This programme supports groups of Cambridge faculty members working together with a common interdisciplinary research interest.
Located in News
POSTPONED: Public Versus Private Perspectives on Open IP
UPDATE: Due to unforeseen circumstances this session has being postponed until further notice. Apologies for any inconvenience caused. The goals of the public, private and third sector in leveraging intellectual property often differ substantially and this has significant implications for access to technology and creating an equitable society. In addition, real life practices in all of these sectors may not reflect stated goals and policies. This session will examine perspectives on Open IP from industry, NGO and University tech transfer perspectives, taking the University of Cambridge as a key example.
Located in Initiatives / Open IP Faculty Research Group
Open as a Tool to Change Ecosystems
Openness can be used strategically to alter the status quo, disrupt ecosystems and technology incumbents, but there are questions as to the effectiveness, extent, timing and impact of open strategies. This session will look into how open technologies have changed ecosystems drawing on case studies in several sectors and also examine how emerging technologies such as the blockchain can themselves change modes and strategies for openness.
Located in Initiatives / Open IP Faculty Research Group